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However, they do have some drawbacks, including an old-school 5/64-inch ring pack and a hefty 758-gram weight.

Also, the dished Speed-Pros do not have valve reliefs in ’em, but TA Performance also sells precut pistons for an extra , and that’s what we used.

The ’75 to ’76 castings have factory 78cc chambers and are never used by TA.

The ’70 heads are 68 cc, and the ’71 to ’74 units have 71cc chambers that are milled to 69 to 70 cc during the rebuild process.

Presumably, this is so the Performer will line up the carb with a factory GS hoodscoop.

The dyno also couldn’t see a difference between the Performer and the B4B, as they performed identically pull after pull, thereby blowing the old Buick bench race talk that the B4B is a better intake.

Speaking of TA, we’ve got to thank Mike Tomaszewski over there, as well as local Buick fan (and owner of a 9-second, naturally aspirated GS455) Bruce Kent, both of whom loaned us parts and expertise.

With Buick cores starting to thin out, we figure you’d better get it right when you build one, not only to preserve the breed but also to live up to the Hemi-stomping heritage with some real street power.

That’s what this story is here for–to deliver the facts about what works and what doesn’t on a simple, budget-built 455.

We prowled the Buick message boards to learn what cams, heads, and intakes were most asked about, and those are the parts we’ll test here for your edification.

We’ll give you the dyno-proven power using multiple combinations of two cams, four intakes, and three sets of heads.

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